OneRoof gaining in presence and relevance

by Alistair Helm in


OneRoof+logo.jpg

OneRoof, the new challenger in the property portal space has made some significant gains over the past 7 months since I last reviewed the site. As I predicted at the time; I foresaw a steady rise of this portal’s ascendancy in the minds of consumers and the real estate industry. The latest data certainly shows that to be the case.

Audience

Let’s start by looking at the key metric of audience. As highlighted in my November article I’ve been using the services of the free web tracking analytics tool SimilarWeb to record the progress of OneRoof and the other portals of Realestate.co.nz and Homes. The service cannot track Trade Me Property as it is not a discrete domain name. As noted at the time, the absolute traffic numbers detailed on SimilarWeb may not actually reflect the true audience numbers, however the trends and comparisons should be judged to be a reliable data set for analytics.

So in terms of top line audience, OneRoof has made significant steps forward. As at the latest data for June, OneRoof recorded a total audience of 1,120,000 as compared to Realestate.co.nz at 1,560,000. This places the audience of OneRoof at the equivalent of 72% the traffic of Realestate.co.nz.

The audience growth over the past year for OneRoof proves the value in the eyes of the consumer of the platform. From a position, a year ago when traffic was less than half that of Realestate.co.nz to now being at 72% of its scale is a significant improvement.

Now, as I stated the actual scale of the audience is not the key number, it is the relativity by comparison to Realestate.co.nz that is most important. At the same time the composition of the audience to the site is also very relevant. As I highlighted back in November, a large proportion of the traffic arriving on OneRoof was actually internal traffic from the NZ Herald website where all the property related stories were hosted on the OneRoof domain name. At that time this referral traffic amounted to 62% of all traffic, that’s nearly two thirds of all traffic viewing pages on OneRoof were actually drawn to the site to read property news stories and not drawn to viewing listings.

The good news for OneRoof executives (and possibly the bad news for Realestate.co.nz executives) is that this reliance on this referral traffic from the NZ Herald website is diminishing as the chart below shows.

Screen Shot 2019-07-10 at 2.19.20 PM.png

As of last month referral traffic has now fallen below search traffic at just 36%; compared to 63% at this time last year. OneRoof is clearly winning in the key arena of search engine optimisation and paid search, which now represents close to half the traffic to the site. That is impressive, as largely this traffic will be looking for property listings.

As I analysed back in November, I like to make an adjustment to the monthly audience figures for OneRoof and excluded the traffic from NZ Herald. The chart below tracks this adjusted traffic to show that for last month the traffic to OneRoof drawn to the viewing of listings is approximately half the scale of the audience to Realestate.co.nz, still a strong performance for a new entrant in the market and clearly still growing.

Screen Shot 2019-07-10 at 2.06.10 PM.png

As a further comment as to source of traffic, the chart below compares the performance of OneRoof with Realestate.co.nz and Homes vs. the same time last year. This ably demonstrates the success OneRoof has achieved in securing search traffic, placing its percentage source at very similar levels to the other sites.

However the mark of a credible and sustainable business online is undoubtedly the direct traffic created from users bookmarking or choosing to go directly to the site. Over the past 12 months the proportion of OneRoof traffic coming direct has risen from 10% to 18% but still languishes below the performance of Realestate.co.nz at 47% and Homes at a staggering 62%.

Screen Shot 2019-07-10 at 9.16.17 PM.png

Listing Page Views


Whilst the overall traffic to a property portal is critical in assessing the value of the offering provided by the company, there is no escape from the fact that aggregation of traffic numbers is not the real value proposition. What is key is individual listing views. Like it or not, what the property portals need to do is to provide agents and their clients, the property owners; with an audience, a very focused audience of potential buyers - active or passive buyers. Therefore the true measure of a portal is page views on individual listings.

Now this is where I have a major complaint of OneRoof. They do not provide open stats on listing pages of the number of views that have occurred on a listing. Something that Trade Me provide, Realestate.co.nz provide and almost all portals worldwide provide. Why should OneRoof choose not to do this? Surely not something they forgot? So from a casual user (or potentially a vendor) perspective it is really hard to see how many times the listing page has been viewed.

Thankfully though OneRoof has built an excellent agent portal to provide such stats of page views for agents listings. I therefore chose to work with some of my colleagues and come up with a sample of relevant stats for listings on OneRoof over recent months. I selected the data of page views over the first 7 days and compare those numbers with the same period on Trade Me and Realestate.co.nz. The first 7 days are without doubt the most relevant marketing period representing more than half of all-time traffic to a listing.

The results details in the chart below are revealing. Whereas Trade Me averages 1,669 page views on a listing in the first 7 days, OneRoof only managed to deliver 70 page views, at the same time over those first 7 days Realestate.co.nz delivered an average of 315 page views. On this basis Trade Me is 20 times more effective than OneRoof and Realestate.co.nz 5 times more effective than OneRoof at delivering exposure to prospective buyers. Clearly the value of OneRoof has yet to be seen in true buyer engagement.

Screen Shot 2019-07-16 at 9.06.38 AM.png

Just for clarity the 11 selected properties are not a random sample. They were all listed in Devonport over the past 6 months. They were all been promoted extensively online across the 3 portals using premium products. Adjacent to the actual page views for each group of listings is the average of the 11 listings - on Trade Me being 1,669 and Realestate.co.nz 315. The other adjacent highlighted number - 1,420 on Trade Me and 315 on Realestate.co.nz is the average 7 days page views for all Devonport listings over the first 6 months of this year (129 listings). Naturally as noted above no such data is available from OneRoof as there is no open data for listings page views.


Content

A property portal has a single task, that of providing consumers with access to view properties for sale or rent. Content is king, and always has been in this digital world.

Back in November I estimated that OneRoof had around 80% of the listings of Realestate.co.nz. I judge that this level has not significantly changed in the past 8 months. To come up with this estimate, I did a somewhat crude assessment by selecting random regions and suburbs to see how the comparison with Realestate.co.nz plays out in the inventory war.

Based on this sample and using a simple weighted average I would say that at this time OneRoof has around 80% of the inventory of Realestate.co.nz. The same position as 8 months ago.

The conspicuously missing franchise brand from OneRoof remains Harcourts. To be clear there are Harcourts listings on OneRoof, however they are few and far between as the total franchise is as yet not fully listing on the portal. Rather than an integrated API feed of all listings, individual offices and agents are listing manually to derive presence on the site.

This situation has such a sense deja vu for me. Back in 2008 Harcourts were the last of the franchise groups to list fully on Trade Me. At the time the pressure coming from the salespeople was enormous and despite the deep principles of the executive team of Harcourts who wanted to support the industry owned site of Realestate.co.nz, the franchise eventually made the decision to list on Trade Me.

Then again in 2013 amid the pricing fiasco by Trade me, Harcourts again were the most vehemently opposed to the proposed pricing change and fought to encourage agents to boycott the platform, with some degree of success; although that boycott has all but slipped into history.

Whilst I admire the deep principle of the Harcourts executive team to hold out from listing on OneRoof, I sense the time for the strategic decisions to list or not was at least a year ago and now that the other major franchises have acceded to the support of OneRoof there is little to be gained in holding out.



OneRoof - a 6 month review

by Alistair Helm in


OneRoof logo.jpg

OneRoof has now been active in the property portal space for just over 6 months and I thought it would be of value to review its success and see what if anything has been the response of the competitors.

When I reviewed this new aspirant back in April, I highlighted what I believed would be the challenges it would face in securing listings and engaging an audience. As ever, these are the two inextricably linked components of a dual-side market that are at the heart of a property portal. For without content, there is no value for a consumer audience, and equally without a consumer audience there is no value for content providers, especially if they are asked to pay for content display.

After 6 months in the market, OneRoof has made significant gains in one of these areas - listing content. From the starting position of having just Bayleys as the foundation content provider they have added a 3 more of the major 5 companies in the industry.

Screen Shot 2018-11-19 at 11.00.04 AM.png

Lacking just Harcourts from the stable of content, I would say that OneRoof now has close to 80% of all real estate agent listings. A significant gain in the past 6 months. At this time no real estate company is paying for a base subscription of unlimited listings, but clearly any misgivings that the industry owners of Realestate.co.nz had in supporting a competitor have been largely ignored in favour of exposing their clients’ listings to as wide an audience as possible.

Touching on that point of ‘free’ base subscriptions, nothing as ever is for free for long and I would suspect that OneRoof will adopt a ‘pay per listing’ model or monthly subscription sometime in 2019. In the meantime their premium product offering is being extensively marketed to agents either as a standalone offering or as an appealing bundled offering with print pages in Herald Homes. This bundling is a very powerful model that uniquely will see a high priority given to OneRoof on the marketing portfolio offered by agents to their clients and I expect to see emerging revenue results for OneRoof in the 2018 full year accounts of parent company NZME.


CONSUMER AUDIENCE

Now this is where I fear OneRoof has a long way to go to seriously challenge the powerful leading incumbents of Trade Me Property and Realestate.co.nz, not that they are not vulnerable, but they do hold a strong and well established brand franchise.

I do not have access to the most accurate and insightful measures for digital platforms, that being Google Analytics or Nielsen digital ratings. I therefore have been tracking the relative performance of OneRoof and its competitors using a global tracking tool by the name of SimilarWeb. This Spanish company analyses web traffic to create a global ranking of all websites and thereby provide detailed estimates for monthly audience and source of audience.

I recognise that the absolute data points reported on SimilarWeb may not be accurate, however when analysing OneRoof, together with Homes.co.nz and Realestate.co.nz on the same platform over the past 6 months it is possible to infer objectivity to their relative performance. It is this comparative perspective that I am interested to present and analyse. Unfortunately SimilarWeb is unable to provide data for Trade Me Property as it is not possible to extract the property data from the main domain of Trade Me as SimilarWeb only tracks primary domains.

OneRoof has grown a relatively sizeable audience in a short space to time. An audience that within the 3rd month had surpassed Homes.co.nz and is currently around half the size of Realestate.co.nz in estimated scale of visits. Again it is worth noting that SimilarWeb can only monitor web based traffic and therefore no analysis has been undertaken on the relative scale of audience to mobile apps for any of these platforms.

Screen Shot 2018-11-19 at 9.47.08 PM.png

Whilst as stated SimilarWeb does not track Trade Me Property it is possible to infer a relative traffic in proportion to Realestate.co.nz based on the comments made at the recent investor presentation of Trade Me where it was stated that their traffic is ‘>2x’ the unique audience of their largest competitor.

Screen Shot 2018-11-19 at 9.52.00 PM.png

In relative terms given how short a time OneRoof has been in operation it appears to be attaining a scale around 25% that of the largest player in the market which is impressive.

However as ever statistics can be misleading when you only observe the headline numbers and fail to dig a little deeper.

When it comes to online traffic a key question that needs to be asked is what is the source of that traffic, is it:

  • Direct traffic - driven by domain name URL being keyed in, this is a key measure of brand awareness?

  • Search engine traffic which comprises organic search a reflection of deep Search Engine Optimisation, together with paid search traffic from Adwords?

  • Social media traffic which also can be through organic or paid traffic?

This is another reason why I favour SimilarWeb, as in addition to tracking traffic on the web for all sites it also track the origin of traffic and this is so enlightening within this segment of property portals in NZ. Detailed below is the comparative make up of the traffic to each of the 3 portals and one data point above all leaps out.

Screen Shot 2018-11-20 at 6.33.10 AM.png

Close on two thirds of all traffic to OneRoof last month was referral traffic, compared to virtually nothing for Homes or Realestate.co.nz. What is the source of this referral traffic? You don’t have to look far to find out that the vast majority 99.92% of all this traffic originates from NZHerald.co.nz.

From day one OneRoof has benefited from the fact that the NZ Herald website rebranded all property articles as OneRoof articles and all property articles are hosted on the oneroof.co.nz domain powering this massive traffic.

So the reality is that two thirds of OneRoof traffic originates from news articles and ad links on the NZ Herald website. I do however concede that once on the OneRoof site, these consumers do browse listings as the number of pages per visit is 4.2 according to SimilarWeb - that compares to 8.5 pages per visit for Realestate.co.nz and 6.4 pages for Homes. I should also point out I have been tracking all of these sites since March and there has been no variance in any of these metrics.

The fact that OneRoof is leveraging the media presence of NZ Herald to drive audience is no surprise, I foreshadowed it in my April article under the section “Media Family”. It’s been the highly successful strategy of Domain.com.au in Australian which leveraged the Fairfax media stable of digital platforms to build a massive audience. However their market leading competitor Realestate.com.au was not slow to bring this to the attention of ist shareholders who wondered how Domain had grown such an audience. Their investor report of 2016 showed that Domain traffic was made up of 70% news articles and just 30% property listings as compared to Realestate.com.au which equally leveraged News Corp digital property news for traffic but only to the tune of 8% of total traffic.

As a further data point to the relative audience across the 3 main portals I would offer up my current property listing which has received 5,276 page views on Trade Me, 1,789 page views on Realestate.co.nz and 382 page views on OneRoof - the listings received similar premium advertising packages on all 3 platforms as part of a significant marketing campaign. These stats whilst a sample of one would seem to support the conclusion that OneRoof has a long way to go to build a consumer franchise to support the premium advertising solutions; having said that they have everything going for them, a great platform and user experience, a strong brand building programme and massive industry support.


COMPETITIVE RESPONSE

As to that comment at the start of this article questioning what if anything has been the reaction of the competitors. Well to be honest when it comes to Realestate.co.nz I suspect nothing. Realestate.co.nz continues to show no signs of any activity - no decision yet even after 18 months as to whether they have a viable new site; nor as to an aligned and unified view of their shareholders, who rightly could and in my view should have seen OneRoof as a real threat and looked for unity within the industry to rally around the industry owned portal.

As for Trade Me, they have quietly got on with the job in hand launching an excellent new premium product which is delighting agent customers, their shareholders and the consumer. In the long term I fear for the future of Realestate.co.nz as OneRoof is undoubtedly going to ‘eat their lunch’.



Facebook’s ambition for real estate could significantly impact Trade Me

by Alistair Helm in


facebook_marketplace_-_Google_Search.png

There is no denying or ignoring the reach and ubiquity of Facebook. Despite the recent setbacks and concerns over privacy and the world of fake accounts. Facebook is the platform to reach any community – true of NZ, as it is in almost any place on the planet.

In NZ more than 2.3 million check it every day. Whether that is to share thoughts, photos or simply to while away a few minutes on the latest meme.

There is as ever always a commercial focus for Facebook, and ever more so of their Marketplace product which holds massive opportunity. It will ultimately allow the company to move beyond advertising and pitch up against Amazon in the broadest sense of retail. In the context of real estate, I don’t foresee a property-for-sale move coming anytime soon, however their early moves have been into rentals and flatmates. These 2 categories happen to be core elements of Trade Me Property’s portfolio representing 27% of their total revenue, equating to $10m per annum according to their most recent financial report.

Presentation5__Autosaved_.png

Just last month in the UK it was announced that Facebook had struck an agreement with the second largest property portal Zoopla and the leading industry owned property portal On The Market to syndicate all of their rental listings into Facebook marketplace. This is a significant move with potentially massive implications for the NZ real estate industry and Trade Me.

Facebook at its core is a community platform that values stickiness – that ability to attract and retain users and monetise them. This is very different to Google that in essence seeks to attract users and then as quickly hand them off to their advertising customers. This difference is significant if we examine the history of property listings syndication in NZ and to some extent globally.

Around 10 years ago Google set up an initiative (Google Base) to present real estate listings on Google Maps – a massively disruptive move which encouraged real estate companies to syndicate their listings to Google to be found on map based search. In many ways bypassing the property portals who were adamant that this was disruptive and damaging to their business model. Most of the global leaders boycotted the platform and in some cases went as far as stopping their Google Adwords marketing budgets which at the time were massive.

The initiative died a few years later and is now consigned to the archives of initiatives Google has tried and killed. The initiative though was something at the time I supported whilst CEO of Realestate.co.nz. I chose to work with Google to support our customers. Realestate.co.nz was an industry owned-portal and in this sense the ambitions of our customers, real estate companies was perfectly aligned for this syndication whereas for Trade Me and the likes of Rightmove and REA Group they were opposed. They feared the ambitions of Google as a truer competitor, being a content aggregator search engine that could disintermediate between the listing originator (real estate company) and the consumer.


So let’s fast forward back to 2018 and Facebook’s partnership in the UK. Already Rightmove the leading property portal has said it will not work with Facebook in syndicating rental listings. Facebook does not want to go direct to real estate companies, property management companies and private landlords to power Facebook Marketplace for rental. It is not in their DNA to be a search engine nor a structured data integrator. Their preference is to partner in order to source a trusted comprehensive feed(s) of listings. In this way they get structured data and don’t have to bother with the interface vagaries of multiple data transfer systems that would be required to be maintained if they went to real estate companies, property management companies or end users.

What attracts Facebook to property rentals and flatmates is stickiness. It also happens to be content that is skewed younger and is perfect social and viral content – all aspects that align to Facebook strategy.

Let’s look at how Facebook Marketplace sits today in terms of inventory of rental and flatmates in NZ for rentals and compare it to Trade Me as shown below, using Wellington as an example.

Presentation5.png

No comparison. At 70 listings on Facebook vs. Trade Me with 1,241. Facebook is stuck in the classic 2 sided market conundrum. Without listings there is no audience engagement and without audience engagement then no appeal to add listings. However Facebook is not without an audience who would flock to Marketplace if they went from 70 listings to 1,241 listings in a day. That would change the dynamic for Facebook Marketplace for property.

So would Trade Me Property syndicate their listings to Facebook? Trade Me effectively is the market in this segment; with all private listings and all property management listings.

In my opinion no way. Trade Me earns over $10m from rental listings. Syndicating these listings might be an appealing proposition that they can offer their customers as a wider audience reach. However it would be, as I see it in their judgement taking traffic away from their platform. So if not Trade Me, where might Facebook access the syndication pipe for rental listings?

Trade_Me_-_Home.png

This is the threat that Trade Me is very likely highly nervous of – what if Realestate.co.nz stepped in and made an arrangement with Facebook?

At this time Realestate.co.nz does not have the depth of content of rentals as their source is only property managers and their inventory today is just over 5,000 as compared to Trade Me at 8,500 rental and over 4,000 flatmates listings. However based on the same principle as I adopted all those years ago the syndication of those listings would be aligned to the outcome to Realestate.co.nz property management customers, offering a vastly expanding audience reach for these listings. If Realestate.co.nz was really ambitious and thinking strategically to could manoeuvre Trade Me. They could build an interface to allow private landlords to list their properties for rent as well as offering a whole new service to flatmates. Such a move would offer all these customers a powerful USP of exposure to the massive Facebook Marketplace audience for free – how powerful could that be? At the same time there is no reason why Realestate.co.nz could not monetise those listings which at say a low $50 per rental / $10 per flatmates. This could generate c. $8m per annum of incremental revenue, even at half those fees $4m is a massive opportunity for Realestate.co.nz.

All of this of course is purely hypotheticals, and sadly I don’t believe that Realestate.co.nz has the vision or courage to take such bold steps. Having said that, Trade Me Property should not rest easily, for it could equally face another challenge. For whilst Realestate.co,nz might not pick up the baton offered by Facebook then maybe OneRoof might judge it worthwhile or even Homes?


Technology could be the saviour of print media for real estate

by Alistair Helm in


hands-information-magazine-6053.jpg

I find myself in my new role, as a licensed real estate agent in the Auckland suburb of Devonport developing a healthy pragmatism of the age-old decision as to the choice of print, or digital media when it comes to property marketing.

Ten years or so ago, I recall standing on-stage at numerous real estate conferences as the CEO of Realestate.co.nz confidently stating that at some time in the not too distant future our lives would have been so transformed by the evolution of digital media, that the humble newspaper would be dead. I foresaw a time when all forms of real estate advertising would be digital. Fast forward those 10 years and clearly that is not the case. Digital is certainly critical; valued by the real estate industry and consumers alike. However our daily newspapers still survive, somewhat depleted and sadly sullied by the race to the bottom, chasing advertising dollars for general advertising heavily driven by eye-catching headlines and lifestyle celeb stories.

However for the real estate industry print media retains a true relevance. As an agent, I value its ability to deliver passive buyers and the even more valued serendipitous buyer. The story can be easily told of buyers (unknowing it at the time) idly flicking through a weekend property supplement or Property Press at the local cafe or friend's house on a quiet afternoon, only to be enthralled by a property that they suddenly become captivated by.

The value of the print media lies in context, and the fact of strangely imprecise targeting - let me explain. The ubiquity of the newspaper places these adverts in close proximity to everyday news thereby potentially interrupting the daily read with an unexpected opportunity to present a property. It also acts as a reinforcement of a property advert to active buyers who may have seen the property online, thereby reinforcing its appeal and relevance, maximising frequency of presentation.

The imprecise targeting is a very interesting counter-logical argument. The very appeal and efficiency of the digital platform which enables for the specific search for 'this number of bedrooms' in 'this price range' in 'this suburb' is the same process that excludes a perfect property that matches all the requirements but is in another suburb that the buyer never thought about. In the case of Auckland, Wellington and Christchurch there are many suburbs that are close substitutes, yet people have fixed mindsets until they are exposed to a house they love the look of, only to find it is located in a suburb that was not on their list, but they go on to buy. That is the power of the print media. Or put another way that is an opportunity as yet not exploited by the digital media players.

So what other capability can print media offer and how might the very latest technology assist them?

Well I came across a very interesting post on Twitter over the weekend in praise of Apple's new ARKit. This is the latest software Apple has released at its recent developer conference to power Augmented Reality. Here's the tweet that peaked my interest and got me thinking about AR a little bit more - watch the embedded short video to get a sense of this capability.

So this example created the sense of an embedded sports video coming to life within a newspaper, leveraging the capability of an iPhone or iPad and the Augmented Reality software. Where you see a sports image and video on a newspaper page, imagine it being a property listing. Simply view the property page with your iPhone and the listing comes alive showing the video of the property or the slideshow for the property.

In someways this is just another iterative step that started years ago with URL weblinks on print adverts, progressed through QR codes and lately encompassed the NZ Herald Homes app that used image recognition that took the user to the listing on the web. All of these technology steps by today's standards seem clunky, especially when you see and imagine this in action (A crude representation made by me shown below roughly visualised).

Presentation1__Autosaved_.png

This really appeals to me. I have so often sat with people who flick through print publications for property listings and want that bit more information but end up frustrated by trying to find listing numbers and search for them on the Trade Me Property or Realestate.co.nz app.

This clearly is a golden opportunity for NZME's OneRoof - the perfect intersection of print and digital. They have the digital content and the print media platform - it'll be interesting to see how long it takes them to develop this and monetise it!

As for Realestate.co.nz and Trade Me - this presents an opportunity, but would require a partnership with a media company. The logical path being Property Press unless the appetite is big enough for Trade Me to make the ambitious move to acquire NZME, a relatively achievable acquisition when you see that NZME market cap is just $165m and Trade Me sits at $1,900m - something for Jon McDonald to think about as a parting shot of for the new Trade Me CEO.


The property portal space just got more competitive – welcome OneRoof

by Alistair Helm in ,


 
All_things_property__under_OneRoof_-_Welcome_to_your_property_future__New_Zealand’s_latest_real_estate_with_the_latest_property_and_market_insights_to_help_make_your_property_decisions_easier.png
 
Once there was one, then became two, a third lasted but a few years, another made some noises, but soon exited, all was quiet for many years before ethnic diversity spawned a new entrant and then with a rush first one and then another came to challenge the two primary incumbents.
— A historical perspective of NZ's property portals

Such is the history of the past 20 years of the digital real estate classified marketplace, those to which I refer can be seen in the chronology below:

1995 – RealEnz was the first property portal in NZ owned originally by REINZ (Real Estate Institute of NZ). It went through a few iterations and stumbles including a time around the turn of the century when the major 5 real estate companies launched a competitor in Realestate.co.nz which lasted 2 years

2005 – Trade Me launched a property classified portal, initially as a private selling (auctioning) platform it soon focused on advertising and sought out the support of the real estate industry. Ray White were the first to sign up with gradually the rest following until by 2009 all were on the platform

2005 – The REA Group from Australian launched Allrealestate.co.nz, leveraging the platform of the Australian Realestate.com.au site, the investment in NZ was significant with mainstream advertising and incentives for agents

2006 – RealEnz re-branded as Realestate.co.nz under a new ownership 50% REINZ and 50% Property Page NZ Limited (Harcourts, Barfoot & Thompson, Bayleys, Ray White, Harveys, LJ Hooker)

2008 – Allrealestate.co.nz closes operations. It all became unsustainable and their focus was on richer international markets

2009 – Sella.co.nz (owned by APN) expands to offer property classified

2011 – Hougarden launches as Chinese language property portal utilising initially a complete listings feed from Realestate.co.nz

2012 – Sella closes

2015 – Homes.co.nz launches initially as a property valuation portal but from 2017 as a listings portal with first supporters of the major brands being Ray White 

2018 – OneRoof (owned by NZME) launches

Powerpoint_images_2018_WIP.png

For most of the past dozen years the digital classified property space has been dominated by the two largest incumbents – Realestate.co.nz and Trade Me Property. They have jostled for leadership, challenging from a position of listings supremacy in the case of Realestate.co.nz, and audience supremacy in the case of Trade Me Property.

Now there is a new contender that has been quietly offering a beta version of a site since December – OneRoof, backed by NZME. It is officially live and open for business and that is reason enough to share my thoughts, opinions and perspective on the new challenger.

Firstly the NZ industry has seen challengers come and go. Allrealestate backed by the Australian REA Group made a valiant effort to take on the market between 2005 and 2009 and made a good job of it. If it had not been for greater international opportunities it could well have succeeded as a long term player. The management knew the business, they held a good share of inventory and they had deep marketing pockets at a time when Realstate.co.nz did not, and Trade Me was of the view that marketing budgets were unecessary.

Equally Sella, albeit a clone of Trade Me made serious plays in 2009 and attracted some listings and certainly had an audience but the industry was not keen on a media owned competitor (at the time owned by APN which of course became NZME).

The landscape in 2018 is somewhat different though, and for this reason and the reasons I will explain below, I believe OneRoof could potentially be a very serious player in this market as early as this time next year.

 

User Experience

The OneRoof platforms of website and mobile apps are superb. They are in my judgement better than either Trade Me or Realestate.co.nz and given the turmoil that seems to be inflicting the latter in terms of its ‘new site’ this competitor puts their efforts to shame.

The platform is rich with a diversity of content, combining listings with property data, highly intuitive search functionality and excellent premium listing presentation. You could criticise them and say there is way too much data covering everything from travel times to crime data, local restaurants to property stats. For me it all works; and you can avail yourself of the richness or ignore it as it is far from intrusive.

From a technical standpoint it is interesting that they have chosen to create 2 browser platforms – a desktop and a mobile version. The more normal approach these days is a single fully responsive single browser experience. Having said that Trade Me still operates two browser platforms although they have been beta testing a fully responsive site for quite a while. The Realestate.co.nz new site is fully responsive (however the original Classic site was actually semi-responsive). There are inherent issues running two browser platforms, but equally fully responsive sites with multiple breakpoints are a technical challenge.

The apps on the mobile device for OneRoof are great based on my testing of the iOS app. The app is great with excellent map based search and great user interface design. The full rich diversity of content is as complete on the app as on the browser.

I have to say as a user OneRoof is the best digital platform on the market today.

 

Existing relationships

The huge advantage that OneRoof has over other challengers like Homes and even I have to say Trade Me is the relationship that NZME has with the real estate companies. These parties have been close for decades as the industry have been supportive advertisers in the NZ Herald and strong bonds exist across all the real estate companies. This is an Auckland skewed situation, but there would be few real estate companies around the country that at sometime or other don't advertise in the Herald or any of the other mastheads that the company operates (Bay of Plenty Times, Hawkes Bay Today, Rotorua Daily Post, Northern Advocate and many others across the North Island).

This trusted relationship will have been tested last year when NZME must have engaged the industry to announce their intention to launch OneRoof. That is what I assume. The fact that the site is live indicates that the industry were comfortable (I might judge this as being somewhere between grudging acceptance and supportive dependent upon which real estate company you talked to).

A big question for me is whether NZME will truly package up online and print advertising in easy bundles for agents to sell to vendors or if has been the case over the years the digital sales teams and print sales teams retain their own account books and end up confusing and forcing agents to choose?

All of that having been said the one worrying issue is that given the site was launched in beta in December and now is fully live in April the inventory support is very low. Of the major 5 real estate companies (who also remember own 50% of Realestate.co.nz) only Bayleys has jumped in 100% with listings. It is surprising and somewhat concerning that OneRoof has not secured any other major yet.

 

Media family

As mentioned the ability for bundled package selling of print & digital is a natural opportunity that NZME has created in this new platform, however the media family offers far more.

As the Australian counterparts have shown in both having media parents (Fairfax in the case of Domain) and News Limited (at least as majority owner of REA Group), there is much to be leveraged in the cross median marketing.

2018-03-31 07.32.36.jpg

Already the weekly NZ Herald property supplement has tipped its hat to OneRoof, I suspect it will not be long before the supplement is branded OneRoof, mirroring the Domain supplement in the Fairfax newspapers The Sydney Morning Herald and The Age. Equally the News Limited papers have used the branding style of Realestate.com.au in their property supplements.

The media machine that produces the newspapers around the country generates a vast amount of content around property which will be honey for the OneRoof audience adding to engagement.

I suspect it will not be long before OneRoof quietly smothers the fledgling specialist Commercial portal of True Commercial; it has been labouring away for many years but OneRoof Commercial makes more sense - a single platform for all types of real estate... all under OneRoof.

 

Maturity of digital media

There is a significant difference between a new competitor entering the market for real estate advertising now as compared to back in 2005 or 2009. The industry, and by that I mean the main 5 companies have a clearer view of how they operate today in the digital space. They have confidence in their industry owned portal of Realestate.co.nz. They judge that the relationship with Trade Me is balanced and they have not witnessed the total demise of print media.

Therefore in my mind, they are more likely to accept the establishment of OneRoof especially as Homes.co.nz is already an emerging competitor which has the full support in terms of listings from Ray White. This in someways demonstrates the split in the make up of the 5 major real estate companies when it comes to digital media. Ray White have always been the first mover as they were in 2005 supporting Trade Me, they equally supported Trade Me after the pricing fiasco in 2013 when Trade Me needed an ally. So they have with Homes, judging it better to take strategic advantage early on rather than follow the herd. Bayleys equally with a seasoned media person as General Manager in Greg Hornblow, can see the strategic advantage of an early agreement with OneRoof. As for Barfoot & Thompson and Harcourts they are the most staunch supporters and board members of Realestate.co.nz so it is no surprise that they are hedging their bets when it comes to Homes and OneRoof. As for LJ Hooker I don’t know, except to say they have not been known for strategic moves.

 

Burdens of incumbents

OneRoof is fortunate that the digital media landscape is somewhat fluid at this time, in this I am referencing the two main players.

Realestate.co.nz is the industry back-stop, supported by all real estate companies but feeling a little bit like it is floundering, given the current platform evolution on the web. Its strategic role as the price setter, has been a massive success. But I feel that this is now assumed by many in the industry to be what it was, not so much what it is or what it might become.

Trade Me Property is still fighting with a hand tied behind its back as a function of ‘long memories’ in the industry to the price changes back in 2013, this has limited the role it once held as a market leader in terms of business model and technical platform. Trade Me needs to establish a new platform urgently, especially in regard to the browser as the mobile apps are great but agents are not as engaged in the platform as they once were.

 

Market conditions

The property market especially in Auckland has clearly cooled and likely to remain cool for the next period, be that a year or more, with an expectation of sluggish growth as opposed to negative growth in both sales volumes and prices. For the rest of NZ the fact is what Auckland leads the rest follow (in time).

This property market is going to be very interesting for the property portals; for whilst a cooler market spells ‘longer time on market’ with a rising inventory (with the attendant rise in revenue for per-listing services) it may not depress overall advertising spend, quite the opposite as a cluttered market with high inventory will require smarter marketing to get properties to stand head-and-shoulders above the rest. The real estate industry is likely to go through a structural shift with a large number of agents exiting, but the overall size of the cake of advertising spend may not reduce markedly.

Given the requirements of smarter marketing a new entrant with smart premium advertising options matched to package bundling of print and digital could well reap huge rewards – OneRoof is so well placed.

 

The kill switch

With all this believe and positive encouragement for OneRoof you would think the champagne corks may be popping down at their Central Auckland head office, there remains though one nightmare reality. It is that the real estate industry holds the ignition keys – the listings.

As long as OneRoof fails to gain a decent foothold of listings inventory, the consumer will lose interest and repeated marketing attempts to re-attract them may reach a point beyond which the consumer may ignore the site completely. It is one thing for Trade Me Property to continue to succeed with 92% of listings it is a vastly different matter for a new site to offer at best 25% of listings. OneRoof needs to be very careful not to offside the major 5 real estate companies as without them they will struggle to get beyond 35% of the market even with Bayleys.