Quarterly Property Review for NZ outside of Auckland - Q2 2018

by Alistair Helm in


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As I have commented recently, I've made a conscious decision to cease to produce data analysis on what is seen as the "NZ Property Market" - the fact is this aggregation is really no longer as relevant, given how distinct the property market is between Auckland the rest of the country. So this is the first of what will be a quarterly report for the aggregation of property data for areas outside of Auckland, complementing the separate report for the Auckland market.

The brief overview of the property market outside of Auckland based on data up to and including July, shows a relatively healthy market with good clearance rate, sales volumes fairly static at a strong level, with prices continuing to rise with mid single digit year-on-year growth.


Volume Sales

From a volume sales perspective - annualised volumes are steady at around 52,000, a level that has been consistent for around 9 months. The past 4 months has seen a very slight increase but not enough to yet call it a upturn. This level is down 16% from the last peak of sales which was close to 2 years ago, far less than the fall seen in the Auckland market which was 37% from peak.

NZ property sales excluding Auckland 10 yrs to Jul 2018

When seen as annual variances in monthly sales, the picture shows modest rises in sales comparing each month with the same month in prior year with barely a perceptible trend up or down.

Property sales for NZ exc Auckland 2000 to Jul 2018 variance yr on yr

Pricing

In terms of pricing the median sales price over the the past quarter has marked time at the $455,000 level. Back in March the median price peaked at $460,000 and subsequently it has bounced around that level but not as yet exceeded it. The chart below tracks the year-on-year variance of monthly median sale prices over the past two decades, showing as it does how consistent property price appreciation has been over this extended period.

NZ median sale price property excluding Auckland 2000 to Jul 2018

Clearance Rate

I am very keen on this relatively new metric of the clearance rate as a tracking tool for the trends in the market. It is measured as the rate of sales against the rate of new listings - think of it as the available stock in a warehouse - if your clearance rate is below 50% then you will suffer the pressure of overstock and will need to adjust prices down to clear inventory. The opposite with a clearance rate of over 50% indicates strong demand which can create price inflation.

As you will see from the chart below the clearance rate for NZ properties outside of Auckland is edging up, as it has been for most of this year so far. The point about clearance rate is that it is all about relative market activity so whilst sales are almost static this is matched to static new listings, within this market dynamic, the properties being listed are being sold at an ever increasing rate; and as the chart shows clearance rate tracks to a pretty close correlation to price inflation. It is also worth comparing the clearance rate outside of Auckland with that in Auckland. Auckland clearance rate is currently just 55% as compared to outside of Auckland at 68%.

Clearance rate of NZ property excluding Auckland tracked with median price movement 2008 to Jul 2018
 


I have added a modified version of the clearance chart below prompted by a comment from John - he was questioning the uneven scale range between price movement and clearance rate. I have used the 50% clearance rate as the midpoint and then adjusted the upper level to +25 percentage points as per the price movement and equally -15 percentage points to the lower level.

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The Auckland Quarterly Property Review - Q2 2018

by Alistair Helm in


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A bit later than planned here is the quarterly report. I've included the latest July property data to produce this analysis of the Auckland property market. As I have commented recently I've made a conscious decision to cease to produce data analysis on what is seen as the "NZ Property Market". The fact is this aggregation for all NZ property data is no longer as relevant, given how distinct the property market is between Auckland the rest of the country. That is why I will produce a quarterly report on Auckland and another one on New Zealand outside of Auckland.

The picture of the Auckland property market now with the benefit of a further 4 months data since the last report is showing a market in the doldrums. A situation that is actually quite uncommon from a historical perspective as compared to the rollercoaster that typifies the Auckland market.


Volume Sales

From a volume sales perspective - annualised volumes have remained at the level of 21,500 for virtually all of the past 9 months with just the vaguest sense of an increase in the past 2 months. Remember this is annualised sales so there is no seasonal factor to explain any movement. This level of sales remains at levels reminiscent of the post GFC period of a decade ago, far from the peak activity of 3 years ago. The decline since that time is significant 37% less sales. 

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When seen as annual variances in monthly sales the same visualisation of the market in the doldrums is reinforced. The typical cycles of the Auckland property market usually see a seesaw rise and fall, whereas the recent period has the appearance of a market just marking time; deciding if the next move will be up or down, almost mirroring the recent proclamation of the Reserve Bank Governor.

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Pricing

In terms of pricing the median sales price over the the past quarter has similarly marked time at the $850,000 level, although July saw this slip down to $835,000. It is now fully 18 months since the Auckland market topped out at $905,000 - subsequent months have seen prices bump around between a low of $820,000 and a high of $880,000. The chart below tracks the year-on-year variance of median sale prices over the past two decades.

Auckland median price movements 2000 to 2018

Clearance Rate

I am very keen on this relatively new metric of the clearance rate as a tracking tool for the trends in the market. It is measured as the rate of sales against the rate of new listings - think of it as the available stock in a warehouse - if your clearance rate is below 50% then you will suffer the pressure of overstock and will need to adjust prices down to clear inventory. The opposite with a clearance rate of over 50% indicates strong demand which can trigger price inflation.

As you will see from the chart below the clearance rate for Auckland is edging up, as it has been for most of this year so far. The point about clearance rate is that it is all about relative market activity so whilst sales are almost static this is matched to very low new listings, within this market behaviour the property being listed is being sold at an ever increasing rate and as the chart shows clearance rate tracks to a pretty close correlation to price inflation. 

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So just maybe the Reserve Bank Governor was righter than he thought when he stated that there was as much chance that property prices would rise as they would fall!

 


The Auckland quarterly property review - Q1 2018

by Alistair Helm in


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Having summarised the broad New Zealand property market for the 1st quarter of 2018, it is critical to examine separately the Auckland property market.

Auckland is a very different market to the rest of the country by fact of scale and greater international influences. Additionally Auckland tends to be a bell-weather to the broader regional market, thereby investigating the local market trends provides insight both for Aucklanders and as a future indicator for the rest of the country.

As far as volume sales are concerned it appears from the latest March data to the end of this first quarter of the year, that we seem to have bottomed out. Sales of properties have been falling for close to two and a half years. Seen on a 12-month-moving-total the Auckland market peaked in October of 2015 and has fallen in volume terms consecutively by 37% since then to the current March 12-month-total of 21,350 sales. We do seem to have avoided dropping below the 20,000 sales a year threshold experienced through the GFC and the rebound in 2011.

The chart below tracks the monthly variance for a year-on-year comparison of Auckland property sales for the past 18 years. It is clear looking at the chart that the market experiences significant volatility in sales movements in Auckland, up over 50% year-on-year at times and equally falling by similar variances. Since that peak in October 2015 the variance has been consistently negative with just couple of months where there was a small correction. As noted in the wider NZ analysis the March month this year did see a surprising fall year-on-year in sales but this is not unusual as can be seen in prior market cycles of the past 18 years.

As I have mentioned many time in the past in the context of property market commentary, a critical issue in NZ analysis of property sales is the number of dwellings and how that has grown over time. In the case of Auckland, hardly a day goes by when the media does not refer to the 'shortfall in housing' affecting the city - whether that shortfall is 20,000 or 50,000 the fact is Auckland has grown at a staggering rate over the past 25 years. 

Based on the trending of the last census data it is likely that Auckland now has surpassed 500,000 dwellings - this is up from around 445,000 10 years ago. This growing level of new dwellings naturally will be a factor in assessing the true level of property sales. Tracking this over the past 10 years further reinforces the market view that we are bottoming out of the cycle at a low level of 4.3% of all homes being sold in the past 12 months, this compared to a 10 year average of 5.4%. The broader NZ position interestingly is that 4.5% of all homes were sold in the past 12 months as compared to a 10 year average of 4.7% emphasing that the Auckland market has fallen in volume terms further than the rest of the country.

As I have often stated I am of the belief that watching closely the sales volume trend is a better indicator of the state of the property market than following the median price, as price is largely a reflection of the state of the market rather than an indicator. This is best demonstrated by the chart below. This analysis which I introduced a couple of months ago tracks the clearance rate to the median price movement. Clearance rate is the relationship between the new listings coming onto the market in a 12 month period of and number of sales.

This latest update to the Auckland chart of Clearance rate to median price shows again evidences the bottoming out in the clearance rate and the start of some degree of increase in the past 4 months, whilst at the same time the median price variance year-on-year is showing an arresting of the fall seen in the past 2 years with the current situation seeing median price level or slightly down compared to this time last year.


Property price trends – a new analysis

by Alistair Helm in


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I recently examined property sales and listings data in order to measure the clearance rates in the property market as a means to better understand the signals within the market as to trending patterns. In the same vein, I have now turned my attention to property prices as measured in the monthly median sales price by REINZ. This data set has a 25 year history, providing a rich period for analysis.

The graph depicting the past quarter of a century is probably well known and understood by those who follow the market.

Over these 25 years, the median price has with the exception of a few pauses and a single period of decline, edged inexorably upward from the starting level of $105,500 in 1992 (in today’s dollars: $175,500) right up to $550,000 at the end of 2017. That represents a 421% increase over the period, allowing for inflation that is a 213% increase – a more than trebling in median sales prices in 25 years.

Examining this chart can leave one with the misleading impression that that prices over recent years have experienced exponential growth. The reason being that a $50,000 rise in 2017 represents a 10% increase – highly visible on the chart, the same 10% rise in 1992 would amount to just $10,000 barely imperceptible on this axis, creating this impression that recent rises are more significant than a decade or two ago.

I've looked for patterns or trends in the path of median price over this protracted period and judge that the 25 years can be split up into 5 distinct periods as I have outlined on the chart, periods ranging from just over 4 years to 6 years.

I have then separately charted each of these periods. For each distinct period I have deliberately created a Y axis that ranges from a minimum of 20% below the median price at the first month of the period; to a maximum range of 110% above the median price at the first month of the period. This has been undertaken so that each chart can be viewed comparatively with each other.

The interpretation I draw from this analysis of the 5 periods of the NZ property market over the past 25 years based on sale price is that we experience cycles, no great surprise! We've had 3 periods of rises ranging in duration from 50 months to 70 months. Each rise has been followed by a plateau period equally lasting from 62 to 70 months. Within the second plateau period from Nov '07 to Jan '13 was the only significant period of falling prices. This decline lasted 23 months and at the lowest point prices fell 8%.

What is equally striking is the comparison of the three periods of property price inflation - the early 90's and the most recent 59 months both attaining a level of just under 50%, compare that with the staggering 102% rise leading up to the GFC over a period of 70 months. Certainly by this analysis the most recent 5 years have seen strong price inflated but nothing of the extreme seen in the early period of the new century.

For me this analysis proved the value in visualising price movements in terms of relative indexing as I have done with paralleled Y axis in each of the 5 periods. This got me thinking as to how to best represent this indexing in a histogram of property price movements. A bit of experimentation and trial and error has produced this new chart below.

It is a binary chart where the criteria is relative 10 months performance against a base month. It seeks to highlight periods that have experience significant increases in property prices or periods where prices have stagnated or declined - picking out individual months.

By way of demonstration to show how the chart is developed, let me explain. So if as an example the median price in January 2002 is less than the average of the median price in the preceding 10 months then January 2002 is judged to be a month of weak sale price and a red bar is displayed. Similarly taking May 2015 if the median price in that month is greater than 5% above the average median price for the preceding 10 months then May 2015 is judged to a month of strong sales price and a blue bar is displayed. The decision surrounding the use of average rather than max or median; as well as the 10 month period as well as the 5% inflation criteria are purely experimental to deliver what I judge to be a valuable visual representation of the property price trends.

I rather like this representation as a visual cue as to the trend in the market highlighting periods of sustained growth, sustained weakness or variability between growth and weakness.

As to interpretation of this chart and the earlier charts as a guide to the future, I will leave that to you the reader as my role here is not to predict the path of property prices, merely to provide a lens through which to view and make your own judgement as you interpret the data.

 

 


Clearance rate tracks property market trends

by Alistair Helm in


The latest NZ Property Report from Realestate.co.nz was published at the end of last week. Its value lies in the key market indicators of inventory and listing numbers, providing a guide to the state of the property market and the trends we are likely to see in the coming months. It can be judged to be a forward-looking report as compared to historical sales data from REINZ. As an industry-owned site, Realestate.co.nz is without doubt the most comprehensive window onto the market with pretty much universal support from all agencies.

The January report covering the last month of 2017 was clear in its headline:

All-time low for new house listings across New Zealand while asking prices continue to climb despite increasing total stock numbers

I might argue, that far from being a surprising headline, the notion of new listings being at “all-time low” is something that has perplexed the market for the greater part of the past 9 years since the GFC.

The chart below shows the annual total of new listings for the past 11 years.

The most recent 12 months has seen a total of 118,647 new listings hit the market. The lowest annual total since data was first collected in 2007. Compared to a year ago, new listings are down 4.5%, with 5,500 less properties for buyers to choose from.

For Auckland though, the most recent 12 months has been a slightly bit brighter. A total of 40,870 new property listings have hit the market, up 8% as compared to last year, however nothing like the c. 60,000 new listings per year seen a decade ago. Auckland may well be finding a new balance between a buyers’ market and a sellers’ market as the NZ Property Report stated and the media promoted, but the City of Sails is far from awash with an abundance of listings.   There are currently at this time just under 9,000 residential properties of all types for sale across Auckland – this for a city of 1.377 million people. Pre-2008 GFC there were around 11,000 properties for sale, at the time, judged a fairly balanced market.

Whilst defining the state of the property market by the measures of inventory and new listings and comparing them to long term averages as Realestate.co.nz does is a fair method. I have though long been pondered how best to measure the state of the property market as a valuable guide to future trends. There is certainly no shortage of stats on the market – sales volumes, new listings, days on the market and inventory. Looking afresh over the past few weeks I have been pondering the notion of clearance rate as an indicator. The idea being that the state of the market can be reflected in the proportion of new listings that actually sell. Simply put, what percentage of properties that are listed are sold in a given time period? This is difficult to do in respect of specific properties, but in aggregate, for a specific time period we can look at the number of sales as a percentage of the number of listings; mashing together the REINZ sales data with the Realestate.co.nz listings data. These two data sets pretty much match apples-with-apples as they represent 100% of all licensed agent listings.

The chart below shows the clearance rate for total NZ residential listings from 2008 to date using a 12 month moving total comparison. To my way of looking at it, a fair representation of the activity in the property market over that period.

Peaking at 74% in the middle of 2016 before slipping back to 62% currently. At its worst, at the start of 2009 in the depth of the GFC just 34% of listings were selling.

For Auckland the picture is somewhat similar, although the most recent 2 years has seen a more significant decline; peaking at 76% at the end of 2015 and slumping to below 50% today – so effectively in Auckland today only half of all new listings are selling, a situation not seen since 2011. The market in Auckland has stalled.

However I feel this analysis of clearance rate is only half the story as everyone always rightly wants to know “how will this effect property prices” – far closer to most people’s real concern in many cases than the clearance rate.

So I decided to overlay property price movements on to this clearance rate data using REINZ median prices and their annual percentage change each month.

The result is the chart below for all NZ property spanning the past 11 years.

The split axis allows for the ability to align the data to better see the correlation – looks like a strong correlation. However would I be going too far to say there is a causation?

The logic is not new or rocket science. As the property market becomes more active with growing confidence of buyers and sellers enabled by encouraging support of banks, so the clearance rate rises, and prices start to rise reflective of demand pressure. The opposite being an easing in sales as finance dries up and confidence falls leading to falling clearance rates, flowing through into easing price pressure.

Undertaking the same analysis for Auckland not surprisingly mirrors this close correlation.

However what I found even more interesting is that if I adjusted the clearance rate and instead of using a 12 month moving total (which provides for the smooth even curves), I used a 3 month moving total.

This representation of the Auckland market certainly supports the hypothesis of the NZ Property Report that Auckland is now a buyers market. But this is not a sudden change which just happened at the end of the year. No; Auckland has been in a buyers market for most of the past 6 months and by December it has plummeted with close to just a third of all listings selling. The key question now is what is the new year likely to bring and how will this chart of clearance rate look after the summer?