The property portal space just got more competitive – welcome OneRoof

by Alistair Helm in ,


 
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Once there was one, then became two, a third lasted but a few years, another made some noises, but soon exited, all was quiet for many years before ethnic diversity spawned a new entrant and then with a rush first one and then another came to challenge the two primary incumbents.
— A historical perspective of NZ's property portals

Such is the history of the past 20 years of the digital real estate classified marketplace, those to which I refer can be seen in the chronology below:

1995 – RealEnz was the first property portal in NZ owned originally by REINZ (Real Estate Institute of NZ). It went through a few iterations and stumbles including a time around the turn of the century when the major 5 real estate companies launched a competitor in Realestate.co.nz which lasted 2 years

2005 – Trade Me launched a property classified portal, initially as a private selling (auctioning) platform it soon focused on advertising and sought out the support of the real estate industry. Ray White were the first to sign up with gradually the rest following until by 2009 all were on the platform

2005 – The REA Group from Australian launched Allrealestate.co.nz, leveraging the platform of the Australian Realestate.com.au site, the investment in NZ was significant with mainstream advertising and incentives for agents

2006 – RealEnz re-branded as Realestate.co.nz under a new ownership 50% REINZ and 50% Property Page NZ Limited (Harcourts, Barfoot & Thompson, Bayleys, Ray White, Harveys, LJ Hooker)

2008 – Allrealestate.co.nz closes operations. It all became unsustainable and their focus was on richer international markets

2009 – Sella.co.nz (owned by APN) expands to offer property classified

2011 – Hougarden launches as Chinese language property portal utilising initially a complete listings feed from Realestate.co.nz

2012 – Sella closes

2015 – Homes.co.nz launches initially as a property valuation portal but from 2017 as a listings portal with first supporters of the major brands being Ray White 

2018 – OneRoof (owned by NZME) launches

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For most of the past dozen years the digital classified property space has been dominated by the two largest incumbents – Realestate.co.nz and Trade Me Property. They have jostled for leadership, challenging from a position of listings supremacy in the case of Realestate.co.nz, and audience supremacy in the case of Trade Me Property.

Now there is a new contender that has been quietly offering a beta version of a site since December – OneRoof, backed by NZME. It is officially live and open for business and that is reason enough to share my thoughts, opinions and perspective on the new challenger.

Firstly the NZ industry has seen challengers come and go. Allrealestate backed by the Australian REA Group made a valiant effort to take on the market between 2005 and 2009 and made a good job of it. If it had not been for greater international opportunities it could well have succeeded as a long term player. The management knew the business, they held a good share of inventory and they had deep marketing pockets at a time when Realstate.co.nz did not, and Trade Me was of the view that marketing budgets were unecessary.

Equally Sella, albeit a clone of Trade Me made serious plays in 2009 and attracted some listings and certainly had an audience but the industry was not keen on a media owned competitor (at the time owned by APN which of course became NZME).

The landscape in 2018 is somewhat different though, and for this reason and the reasons I will explain below, I believe OneRoof could potentially be a very serious player in this market as early as this time next year.

 

User Experience

The OneRoof platforms of website and mobile apps are superb. They are in my judgement better than either Trade Me or Realestate.co.nz and given the turmoil that seems to be inflicting the latter in terms of its ‘new site’ this competitor puts their efforts to shame.

The platform is rich with a diversity of content, combining listings with property data, highly intuitive search functionality and excellent premium listing presentation. You could criticise them and say there is way too much data covering everything from travel times to crime data, local restaurants to property stats. For me it all works; and you can avail yourself of the richness or ignore it as it is far from intrusive.

From a technical standpoint it is interesting that they have chosen to create 2 browser platforms – a desktop and a mobile version. The more normal approach these days is a single fully responsive single browser experience. Having said that Trade Me still operates two browser platforms although they have been beta testing a fully responsive site for quite a while. The Realestate.co.nz new site is fully responsive (however the original Classic site was actually semi-responsive). There are inherent issues running two browser platforms, but equally fully responsive sites with multiple breakpoints are a technical challenge.

The apps on the mobile device for OneRoof are great based on my testing of the iOS app. The app is great with excellent map based search and great user interface design. The full rich diversity of content is as complete on the app as on the browser.

I have to say as a user OneRoof is the best digital platform on the market today.

 

Existing relationships

The huge advantage that OneRoof has over other challengers like Homes and even I have to say Trade Me is the relationship that NZME has with the real estate companies. These parties have been close for decades as the industry have been supportive advertisers in the NZ Herald and strong bonds exist across all the real estate companies. This is an Auckland skewed situation, but there would be few real estate companies around the country that at sometime or other don't advertise in the Herald or any of the other mastheads that the company operates (Bay of Plenty Times, Hawkes Bay Today, Rotorua Daily Post, Northern Advocate and many others across the North Island).

This trusted relationship will have been tested last year when NZME must have engaged the industry to announce their intention to launch OneRoof. That is what I assume. The fact that the site is live indicates that the industry were comfortable (I might judge this as being somewhere between grudging acceptance and supportive dependent upon which real estate company you talked to).

A big question for me is whether NZME will truly package up online and print advertising in easy bundles for agents to sell to vendors or if has been the case over the years the digital sales teams and print sales teams retain their own account books and end up confusing and forcing agents to choose?

All of that having been said the one worrying issue is that given the site was launched in beta in December and now is fully live in April the inventory support is very low. Of the major 5 real estate companies (who also remember own 50% of Realestate.co.nz) only Bayleys has jumped in 100% with listings. It is surprising and somewhat concerning that OneRoof has not secured any other major yet.

 

Media family

As mentioned the ability for bundled package selling of print & digital is a natural opportunity that NZME has created in this new platform, however the media family offers far more.

As the Australian counterparts have shown in both having media parents (Fairfax in the case of Domain) and News Limited (at least as majority owner of REA Group), there is much to be leveraged in the cross median marketing.

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Already the weekly NZ Herald property supplement has tipped its hat to OneRoof, I suspect it will not be long before the supplement is branded OneRoof, mirroring the Domain supplement in the Fairfax newspapers The Sydney Morning Herald and The Age. Equally the News Limited papers have used the branding style of Realestate.com.au in their property supplements.

The media machine that produces the newspapers around the country generates a vast amount of content around property which will be honey for the OneRoof audience adding to engagement.

I suspect it will not be long before OneRoof quietly smothers the fledgling specialist Commercial portal of True Commercial; it has been labouring away for many years but OneRoof Commercial makes more sense - a single platform for all types of real estate... all under OneRoof.

 

Maturity of digital media

There is a significant difference between a new competitor entering the market for real estate advertising now as compared to back in 2005 or 2009. The industry, and by that I mean the main 5 companies have a clearer view of how they operate today in the digital space. They have confidence in their industry owned portal of Realestate.co.nz. They judge that the relationship with Trade Me is balanced and they have not witnessed the total demise of print media.

Therefore in my mind, they are more likely to accept the establishment of OneRoof especially as Homes.co.nz is already an emerging competitor which has the full support in terms of listings from Ray White. This in someways demonstrates the split in the make up of the 5 major real estate companies when it comes to digital media. Ray White have always been the first mover as they were in 2005 supporting Trade Me, they equally supported Trade Me after the pricing fiasco in 2013 when Trade Me needed an ally. So they have with Homes, judging it better to take strategic advantage early on rather than follow the herd. Bayleys equally with a seasoned media person as General Manager in Greg Hornblow, can see the strategic advantage of an early agreement with OneRoof. As for Barfoot & Thompson and Harcourts they are the most staunch supporters and board members of Realestate.co.nz so it is no surprise that they are hedging their bets when it comes to Homes and OneRoof. As for LJ Hooker I don’t know, except to say they have not been known for strategic moves.

 

Burdens of incumbents

OneRoof is fortunate that the digital media landscape is somewhat fluid at this time, in this I am referencing the two main players.

Realestate.co.nz is the industry back-stop, supported by all real estate companies but feeling a little bit like it is floundering, given the current platform evolution on the web. Its strategic role as the price setter, has been a massive success. But I feel that this is now assumed by many in the industry to be what it was, not so much what it is or what it might become.

Trade Me Property is still fighting with a hand tied behind its back as a function of ‘long memories’ in the industry to the price changes back in 2013, this has limited the role it once held as a market leader in terms of business model and technical platform. Trade Me needs to establish a new platform urgently, especially in regard to the browser as the mobile apps are great but agents are not as engaged in the platform as they once were.

 

Market conditions

The property market especially in Auckland has clearly cooled and likely to remain cool for the next period, be that a year or more, with an expectation of sluggish growth as opposed to negative growth in both sales volumes and prices. For the rest of NZ the fact is what Auckland leads the rest follow (in time).

This property market is going to be very interesting for the property portals; for whilst a cooler market spells ‘longer time on market’ with a rising inventory (with the attendant rise in revenue for per-listing services) it may not depress overall advertising spend, quite the opposite as a cluttered market with high inventory will require smarter marketing to get properties to stand head-and-shoulders above the rest. The real estate industry is likely to go through a structural shift with a large number of agents exiting, but the overall size of the cake of advertising spend may not reduce markedly.

Given the requirements of smarter marketing a new entrant with smart premium advertising options matched to package bundling of print and digital could well reap huge rewards – OneRoof is so well placed.

 

The kill switch

With all this believe and positive encouragement for OneRoof you would think the champagne corks may be popping down at their Central Auckland head office, there remains though one nightmare reality. It is that the real estate industry holds the ignition keys – the listings.

As long as OneRoof fails to gain a decent foothold of listings inventory, the consumer will lose interest and repeated marketing attempts to re-attract them may reach a point beyond which the consumer may ignore the site completely. It is one thing for Trade Me Property to continue to succeed with 92% of listings it is a vastly different matter for a new site to offer at best 25% of listings. OneRoof needs to be very careful not to offside the major 5 real estate companies as without them they will struggle to get beyond 35% of the market even with Bayleys.